Artificial Flowers Allowed Until March 15 at Mifflin and Riverside Cemeteries

GAHANNA, Ohio – The Mifflin Township Service Department, in conjunction with a committee to review cemetery rules and procedures, has moved the date for placing artificial flowers on the graves back to mid-November to allow visitors who tend to graves during the upcoming holiday to decorate with artificial flowers. Previously, cemetery rules stated that Dec. 1 was the earliest that all artificial decorations could be placed on the ground or on the headstone. Flowers can be left until March 15.

“Knowing that many families visit their loved ones graves on Thanksgiving weekend, we thought it made sense to move the date back to prior to Thanksgiving,” said Daril Tharp, Mifflin Township Service Director.

As a reminder, artificial flowers should be securely fastened to the headstone or on the ground. According to cemetery officials, winter time brings high winds and snow storms through Ohio, and artificial flowers not securely fastened often end up scattered across the cemetery grounds.

Visitors to graves are reminded that any obstruction protruding from the ground that hinders cemetery maintenance is prohibited, such as shepherd hooks, solar lights and seasonal/decorative flag holders. All small items must be secured to the base of the stone, not on the ground. Additionally, glass vases and other glass items are no longer allowed in the cemetery for safety reasons.

For a complete list of the rules and regulations, visit the Service/Cemetery Department office at 218 Agler Rd. and pick up a copy, call (614) 471-4494 or visit http://mifflin-oh.gov/departments/cemetery/rules_and_regulations.php#.VgQRM8u6f3k to download a copy. Additionally, signs have been added to the cemetery notifying visitors of the date change.

As a reminder, Agler Road, which extends through the cemetery, has been closed to through traffic in an effort to deter motorists from using the cemetery to cut through from Agler Road to Old Ridenour Road. The number of drivers using the cemetery as a cut through has increased over the past year, and in an effort to protect both workers and visitors, a permanent gate has been installed.